25 Great Questions

Great questions help people feel invited, known, and interesting. These questions are open-ended, sincere, and curious. Poor questions can make people feel like they are being quizzed – or like they are a hassle. Asking great questions takes practice and preparation. Think about questions in advance – then be present, ask away, and listen.

The power of questions resides in the second question. While someone is answering the initial question, they may be cautiously wondering, “do they really want to know? Do they want to know me, or are they just asking to be nice? Are they just trying to get around the room?”

Your second question invites them to share more. Second questions sound like, “tell me what you mean?” or “then what happened?” or “do you mind telling us more?”

After A Sermon

  1. What was most memorable for you?
  2. What was their main point?
  3. What does the Bible say about this?
  4. How can we apply it?
  5. What is a takeaway for you personally?

Objective: fully engage with the content and with how it connects to God and each other.

Stories

  1. Where are you from?
  2. How did you meet your spouse?
  3. Tell us about your faith journey.
  4. What have you been learning about God lately?
  5. What does it mean to be your friend?

Objective: get to know each other and our testimonies.

Book Study

  1. What was the author’s main point?
  2. How did that fit in with the overall theme of the book?
  3. What was most impactful for you personally?
  4. What does the Bible say about this?
  5. What can we do this week based on what we read?

Objective: fully engage with the content and with how it connects to God and each other

Bible Study

  1. What did this mean to the original hearers?
  2. What does this mean in context of the surrounding text? In context of the whole of scripture?
  3. What does this say about God?
  4. What does this say about us/me?
  5. What can we apply based on what we read?

Objective: learn how to study the word and apply it together.

Icebreakers

  1. Who are you most alike in your family? Why?
  2. If you could study anything for a year, what would it be? Why?
  3. If we asked five friends to describe you, what words would they use?
  4. What (animal, superhero, cartoon, etc) are you most like? Why?
  5. Are you more introverted or extroverted? And – what do you think is misunderstood about (whichever they choose)?

Objective: get to know each other, not just to have random information about one another.